Bottle Brush

Vikan
Vikan Bottle Brush
Series 5381-90
Available in 6 colors

Vikan Bottle Brush - GreenVikan Hook Brush - BlueVikan Bottle Brush - RedVikan Bottle Brush - WhiteVikan Bottle Brush - YellowVikan Bottle Brush - Black

Manufactured with no joint between the handle and brush head, the brush removes a common repository of contaminants. When cleaning, it’s the brush bristle tips that do most of the cleaning. The brush head features extra-stiff bristles at the front, enabling you to clean more quickly and effectively. The bottle brush is intended to clean bottles, drains, and other curved surfaces. The one-piece construction of handle and head is made from FDA compliant polypropylene. Extra-stiff polyester bristles are effective at removing stubborn debris from surfaces.

Specifications:
Length: 16.90”
Width: 3.50”
Height: 3.50”
FDA Compliant Raw Material: Yes
Block Material: Polypropylene
Bristle Material: Polyester
Other Material: Stainless Steel
Unit Weight: 0.44 lbs

Vikan Bottle Brush - Action ShotVikan Hook Brush - Alternate Angle 1 width=Vikan Hook Brush - Alternate Angle 2Vikan Hook Brush - Alternate Angle 3



Download Product Sheet:

Vikan Bottle Brush – 5381-90-x

Hook Brush

Vikan
Vikan Hook Brush
Series 5372
Available in 6 colors

Vikan Hook Brush - GreenVikan Hook Brush - BlueVikan Hook Brush - RedVikan Hook Brush - WhiteVikan Hook Brush - YellowVikan Hook Brush - Black

Cleaning between and around pipes is made easier with the curved design of the hook brush. The hand grip utilizes a threaded recess on the end that allows another handle to be connected to the brush. When connected to a Vikan handle, the extended hook brush allows comfortable cleaning of pipes in high or difficult to reach areas. All materials are FDA compliant, and the grip matches the bristle color for easy integration into a color-coding program.

Specifications:
Length: 14.17”
Width: 7.87”
Height: 2.16”
FDA Compliant Raw Material: Yes
Block Material: Polypropylene
Bristle Material: Polyester
Other Material: Stainless Steel
Unit Weight: 0.35 lbs

Vikan Hook Brush - Action ShotVikan Hook Brush - Alternate Angle 1Vikan Hook Brush - Alternate Angle 2Vikan Hook Brush - Alternate Angle 3



Download Product Sheet:

Vikan Hook Brush – 5372x

Grout Brush

Vikan
Vikan Grout Brush
Series 7040
Available in 5 colors

Vikan Grout Brush - GreenVikan Grout Brush - BlueVikan Grout Brush - RedVikan Grout Brush - WhiteVikan Grout Brush - Yellow

This brush is excellent for scrubbing in difficult to reach areas or areas where you only have limited space. The grout brush is suitable for cleaning under equipment, between equipment, getting into corners, cleaning the crevices between floors and walls. The grout brush, with extra stiff angle cut bristles, is great for cleaning grout and other difficult areas. It is mounted with a thread adapter that can be removed for easy cleaning of the whole product. The neck allows for 180° of rotation, great for reaching under equipment.

Specifications:
Length: 8.86”
Width: 1.38”
Height: 3.54”
FDA Compliant Raw Material: Yes
Block Material: Polypropylene
Bristle Material: PET
Other Material: Stainless Steel
Unit Weight: 0.53 lbs

Vikan Grout Brush - Action ShotVikan Grout Brush - Alternate Angle 1Vikan Grout Brush - Alternate Angle 2Vikan Grout Brush - Alternate Angle 3



Download Product Sheet:

Vikan Grout Brush – 7040x

Training & Development

Over the last quarter, Remco’s Training and Development team provided cost-free technical support and training to several distributors and end-users. Our training included helping distributors identify opportunities and sell solutions that meet the challenges of HACCP. We also trained end-users on the proper care and maintenance of tools, and the principles of hygienic design.

In April, we attended the Conference for Food Protection held in Boise, Id. One of the overarching themes of the conference was the influence of consumers on the food industry. Consumers are pushing food safety at retail and introducing new challenges. These challenges include the anti-processing movement, reducing food waste, limiting produce related outbreaks, detecting biofilms, and the changing mindset of employees. Stay tuned for future newsletters, articles, and whitepapers from Remco as we continue to keep abreast of these trends.

Also in April, we attended the Food Safety Summit in Chicago, Ill. At the conference, Mike Taylor, deputy commissioner for foods and veterinary medicine, gave his final talk before leaving the FDA. Taylor discussed his view on the industry’s progress toward FSMA compliance, and made a point to express his gratitude and appreciation of all the people responsible for championing food safety. Taylor believes the hardest part of implementation is still to come, as the industry moves toward complying with operational requirements. Another key takeaway of the conference came from Joe Corby, the executive director of AFDO. Corby encouraged consumers and industry to make sure legislators continue to fund food safety efforts so the movement maintains momentum.

The members of Remco’s Training and Development team are looking forward to interfacing with distributors and end-users over the next few months. The industry has many new challenges to discuss, and Remco has many potential solutions to share. If you or your company needs additional support, contact us. We are eager to help.

From the Sales Desk

First, thank you for helping us get off to a strong start in 2016. We value every business relationship and we know our growth is dependent on building strong partnerships with end users and distributors. We promise to continue offering the highest levels of service, support, and products that have made you turn to us for your sanitation and material handling needs over the years.

One exciting example of our commitment to the market is our internal continuing education program. Last year every member of our business development team received his HACCP certification. This year we are working toward additional certifications in Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs). Additionally, several members of our support staff are working through various food-safety training programs. We view continuing education as a critical function for staying up to date on the needs of the industry and providing the expertise you need.

Remco is also excited for the continued expansion of our sales team. Over the last quarter, we added additional sales staff to better support our strategic partners and build new relationships with others. As we grow, we are making conscious efforts to continue our high level of service and support.

With another busy show season approaching, we are excited to see many familiar and some new faces. Please let us know if you will be attending any of these upcoming events.

  • • IAFP 2016 – 7/31/16 – 8/3/16 at Booth #920
  • • ISSA Interclean 2016 – 10/26/16-10/28/16 at Booth #3154
  • • IPPE 2017 – 1/31/17 – 2/2/17

If you would like to schedule a face-to-face meeting while attending one of these shows, please contact Rob Middendorf at rmiddendorf@remcoproducts.com or Dustin Milstead at dmilstead@remcoproducts.com.

Challenges

Every business and market has challenges, if they did not, businesses would never fail. The trick for each of us is identifying those impediments and determining how they will affect our companies and markets.

FSMA was created to help overcome the many challenges faced by the food industry, but with its creation comes even greater obstacles.

While there are obvious challenges to the food industry like recalls, foodborne illness, and hygienic design, solutions are not always so obvious.

The products Remco offers are part of the solution. Our challenge is determining what else we can do to help you overcome your challenges. Whether you are a seller trying to connect your customers to the best solutions, or a food producer trying to determine how to most effectively create and implement a color coding plan, our goal is getting you not only the products you need but the support as well.

Thank you for your business and we look forward to continued success.

Regards,

Mike Garrison
President Remco Products

Newsletter – Q1, 2016

White Paper: The Hygienic Design of Food Industry Brushware

The Hygienic Design of Food Industry Brushware White Paper

Minimising Contamination, Maximising Food Safety
The Hygienic Design of Food Industry Brushware – the good, the bad and the ugly

Cleaning is a critical step in the management of food safety. Consequently, the correct selection of cleaning equipment by the food manufacturing and food service industries is essential to minimize the risk of product contamination, and aid compliance to relevant regulatory, guidance and standard requirements.

This white paper Vikan will help you understand:

  1. Hygienic design criteria
  2. Hygienic design assessment of food industry brushware
  3. Compare the different types brushware used in the food industry
  4. The benefits of using UST products in hygiene critical areas

Download this White Paper

What you need to know about FSMA: Part 1

If you are in the food industry and have had your eyes and ears open, then most likely you have heard the word FSMA being thrown around… a lot. However, some people might find themselves unfamiliar with the term or have limited knowledge of it, so in this entry we are going to cover some general information regarding FSMA and in upcoming blogs we will go into further detail about each proposed rule issued by the FDA that supports this legislation.

image00

The people, pathogens and food of today are not those of the past. Our population is living longer and with problems that make them more susceptible to foodborne illness complications. Pathogens are evolving and becoming more adaptable and harder to kill. Our food is traveling more than it ever has. For example, the FDA states that 15% of food we eat is imported. A total 75% of our seafood, 20% of our vegetables, and 50% of our fruit is imported. However, one thing has not changed and that is the threat that foodborne illness presents to the food industry and its consumers. Continue reading What you need to know about FSMA: Part 1

Hosting My First Thanksgiving

Hosting a Thanksgiving dinner is already stressful to begin with, especially if you have a large family like myself, but being a food safety enthusiast added a whole new level of importance to the holiday because I wanted to take this opportunity to teach my family more about food safety.

Thanksgiving Turkey

In my family we rotate who hosts Thanksgiving so it doesn’t fall on the same person every year to do all the work…and this year was my year.  I was so excited because my husband and I just recently got a house and I was anxious to show off my hosting, cooking, and most importantly, my food safety skills.

The whole process started about two weeks before the event when I went to the grocery store to get the turkey. I worried that if I procrastinated buying the turkey then the store would run out. (Side note…I went to the store the day before Thanksgiving to grab last minute items and there were TONS of turkeys left). I put the turkey in the freezer when I got home.

As the host, we were responsible for the turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes and a sweet potato and carrot sauté, while the rest of the family was responsible for other various traditional Thanksgiving dishes.  About five days before Thanksgiving I went and bought the rest of the ingredients and promptly put them in the refrigerator or pantry when I got home.  A few days before Thanksgiving, I moved the turkey from the freezer to the refrigerator to safely start thawing and I also cubed loaves of bread to lay out to dry out for the stuffing (my family does not actually stuff the turkey, so some may call this dressing).

Food Thermometer

The day before Thanksgiving was prep time, so I washed and cut celery, diced onion, peeled and cut carrots and cleaned the turkey.  I stored the prepped ingredients in proper containers and put them in the refrigerator until the big day.  While doing so, I made sure to wash my hands, utensils, and countertops thoroughly between handling the raw turkey and my produce. No cross-contamination at this house!  I also calibrated my meat thermometer in case I had to get a new one. (You can do this by boiling a pot of water, sticking your thermometer in the water, not touching the pot, for 1 minute and you should read a temperature between 210-214°F).

The day of Thanksgiving, after the oven was preheated, I got Fred out of the refrigerator (yes, I named the turkey) and put him into the roaster, smothered him with butter, surrounded him with stuffing, and put him in the oven covered.

Meanwhile, my sister-in-law brought appetizers that we snacked on before the big dinner, such as cheese and crackers, deviled eggs, and chex mix. I made sure to refrigerate the perishable items as soon as she arrived, and only put out a portion of each appetizer at a time and refilled the snacks only when needed, leaving nothing out that should be refrigerated for more than 2 hours.

I checked the turkey about every hour to baste and stir the stuffing, meanwhile getting the rest of the food prepared and cooked. Finally, after 4.5 hours the thermometer read 165°F when I checked the turkey. I did this by inserting the thermometer in to the meatiest portion of the turkey and made sure to not get too close to the bone because that will give an inaccurate reading. The rest of the food was ready, so we feasted!

After Thanksgiving dinner, my husband and I cleaned the dishes and stored the leftovers in the refrigerator right away. I did not sit until all the leftovers were put in shallow containers (to allow for quicker cooling than deep containers). I divided the leftovers into individual containers for my family members to take home. I made sure to make it a point to tell them as a general rule to freeze or eat the leftovers within 3-4 days and to put the containers in the refrigerator as soon as they get home.

All in all, I was in the kitchen for about 8 hours that day. It was stressful, exhausting, and completely wonderful. I practice food safety in my everyday life, but this time I wanted to set an example for my family to observe and practice when it is their turn to host.

For more information on Thanksgiving and Holiday food safety please visit:  
http://www.cdc.gov/features/turkeytime/ 
http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodborneIllnessContaminants/BuyStoreServeSafeFood/ucm328131.htm