How to Choose the Right Brush for Food Processing

Proper cleaning tools can increase plant hygiene and make it easier for food processing facility staff to do their job. Finding the right brushes for each job is easier when you understand the role bristle stiffness, brush type, and bristle/block attachment play in how a brush functions.

Hygienic Design of Brushes

Drilled and stapled brushes are made by drilling a hole into the brush block and stapling bristles into it. Higher quality versions will have only small gaps near the attachment point, making it less likely for contaminants to become trapped. Low-quality versions may have issues with bristles falling out and will have larger gaps around the fiber attachment points, making it easier for microorganisms to hide and multiply. For many food processing needs, a high-quality version of this type of brush is appropriate.

Resin-set brushes pose a variety of hygiene concerns. For this brush, holes are drilled in the block, filaments are stapled into them, and resin is added for extra bristle security. Resin itself isn’t approved for food contact and often gets trapped in between bristles and falls out, creating a source of contamination. This type of brush isn’t suitable for food manufacturing.

Ultra Safe Technology (UST) brushes from Vikan improve bristle retention and brush hygiene. These innovative brushes have a unique construction and design. Bristles are fully molded into individual bristle security units. Those units are then molded directly into the brush block, eliminating holes, gaps, and contamination traps. Because of this production technique, bristle security units can be arranged in patterns that allow brushes to be cleaned easily while maximizing cleaning efficiency. These ultra-hygienic brushes are ideal for food production plants that make infant formula, baby food, and ready-to-eat food.
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How to Choose the Right Broom for the Job

Maintaining hygienic standards is easier when employees have access to the right tools for the job, including the proper brooms. The staff in charge of cleaning will be better able to carry out cleaning tasks effectively and efficiently when they have tools that are fit-for-purpose.

Hygienic Design of Brooms

Drilled and stapled brooms are produced with the traditional method of folding bristles and stapling them into a block. This creates a tight fit that holds bristles in place. When a tool is well-designed, there are minimal places for contaminants to hide in and multiply. However, bristles have been known to fall out, though less frequently on better-quality tools. For most food industry purposes, this provides a high level of hygiene and supports sanitation efforts.

Resin-set brooms have cropped up in recent years, but they present a host of hygiene concerns—namely, that the resin itself isn’t approved for food contact and have been known to fall out of the broom, creating and spreading its own contamination. This type of broom isn’t recommended for food processing.

Ultra Safe Technology (UST) brooms from Vikan are state-of-the-art tools that have a unique design and construction that improves bristle retention and hygiene. Bristles are fully molded into bristle security units in patterns that maximize efficiency while allowing the broom itself to be cleaned easier. This level of hygiene is appropriate for facilities that require a higher level of cleanliness, such as ready-to-eat food, baby food, and infant formula processing plants.
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The Importance of Hand Washing in the Food Industry

Hygienic nail brush being used in hand washing
Handwashing in the food industry is one of the first lines of defense in food safety. Along with being a consumer health risk, inadequate personal hygiene can lead to costly and reputation-destroying recalls. However, it’s not just the responsibility of individual employees to ensure proper handwashing procedures are followed. Managers must cultivate a culture of food safety where taking time-off from lines to wash up is encouraged. Facilities also must be equipped with adequate hand washing stations.

Not only will setting the scene and creating the culture for effective handwashing help protect consumers, it will also help protect your business.

When to Wash

Employees knowing when to wash their hands is just as important as knowing how to properly wash them. High-visibility signs posted around the facility can teach and remind employees about handwashing. 

Signs posted around the facility make for great reminders, but the topic should also be covered in training seminars. Don’t forget to translate instructions in whatever languages required to communicate with all of your employees.

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Food Safety Culture – Color-Coding for the Color-Blind

Food production facilities often rely on color coding their tools and workstations to create zones of control. These zones can designate areas where allergens are used to prevent cross-contact incidents, separate raw – from finished products to avoid cross-contamination issues, or visually represent different shifts to account for concerning potential direct-contamination trends. Color coding is generally easy to understand and provides a universal language for people of all levels of literacy -and – language background.

However, for 1 in 12 men and 1 in 200 women, some colors may be difficult or impossible to discern. Color-blindness comes in many forms, but the most common type is partial color-blindness, where the person can’t distinguish between a couple or a few colors. Of those, the two forms of red/green color-blindness: deuteranopia (reduced sensitivity to red light) and protanopia (reduced sensitivity to green light), occur most frequently. That doesn’t imply color coding as a zoning solution doesn’t work for color-blind employees, but it does mean that colors should be chosen carefully to avoid the most common color-blindness pairings.
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AFDO Journeys Toward the Integrated Food Safety System Vision

As an AFDO industry member, Remco Products Corporation is proud to have participated in the 121st Association of Food and Drug Officials Conference this June. Over 400 members from federal, state, and local agencies, as well as members of industry groups, trade associations, consumer organizations, and academia, made the trip to Houston for the recent conference.

AFDO has, over time, become a recognized voice in promoting uniform, simplified, and efficient laws, regulations and guidelines related to food safety and public health. Their humble beginning predates the existence of the FDA by 10 years when in 1896, two state commissioners from Michigan and Ohio met in Toledo to discuss the difficulties of manufacturing food in one state and shipping it to another, where the same product may not have complied with the local statutory regulations.

The push for states to collaborate and come to a mutually acceptable solution eventually resulted in a streamlined regulatory solution across the states. With time, AFDO became a forerunner in publishing model codes and guidance for various foods, which have been used to formulate aligned state regulations. The defining moment arrived in 1998, when AFDO was the first to offer a vision of a national Integrated Food Safety System (IFSS) that would empower state and local authorities to collaborate effectively with their federal counterparts. The crowning glory came with the passage of FSMA in 2011, which shifted the FDA’s focus from the reactive to the preventive mode of addressing food safety risks, which also mandated the adoption of IFSS across the food supply network.

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White Paper: HACCP vs. HARPC

HACCP vs. HARPC: A Comparison White Paper

HACCP vs. HARPC: A Comparison White Paper

HACCP and HARPC share more than just four letters. They’re both food safety standards based on prevention, but they do differ on execution. Their differences and the similarities aren’t as important as the way they fit together for most food processors, though. A HARPC plan shouldn’t be considered as a replacement, but as a necessary upgrade to the conventional HACCP plan. Understanding how the systems fit together is the first step toward implementing both.

This white paper will help you understand:

  1. Key comparison points between
  2. HARPC as an upgrade to HACCP
  3. How HACCP works
  4. 12 steps of HACCP
  5. How HARPC works
  6. 7 steps of HARPC

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White Paper: Cleaning Tool Maintenance

Optimizing Food Safety Through Good Cleaning Tool Maintenance White Paper

Optimizing Food Safety Through Good Cleaning Tool Maintenance

Cleaning is a critical step in the management of food safety and quality. Consequently, the correct maintenance of cleaning tools by the food industry is essential to minimize the risk of microbial, allergen, and foreign body cross-contamination. This, in turn, aids compliance to relevant regulatory and legal requirements, HACCP prerequisite programs, and audit standards.

This white paper will help you understand:

  1. What the Global food safety schemes say about cleaning tool maintenance
  2. What you need to do to comply with these safety schemes
  3. Identifying the hazards
  4. Risk Assessment
  5. Validation
  6. Monitoring
  7. Verification

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Remco Products, Vikan to Host Food Safety Mini-Sessions at IAFP 2017

Remco and Vikan to sponsor 12 sessions on food safety and hygienic design

Remco Products and Vikan will present a series of short technical food safety seminars at this year’s IAFP convention. Eight speakers will deliver 12 timely sanitation and hygiene presentations. Each 15-minute presentation will take place at booth #321.

Presentation topics include hygienic design, minimizing cross-contamination, food safety regulation, validating cleaning processes, metal detectable brush bristles, and trends in food safety. Each speaker will take questions after their brief presentation, and the final session on Sunday offers a more interactive experience with a hygienic design of brushware workshop. The workshops begin at 8 p.m. on Sunday; 12:15 and 5:15 p.m. on Monday; and 12:15 p.m. on Tuesday.

Dr. John Holah, technical director of Holchem Laboratories, will start the series off on Monday. Holah is an applied microbiologist whose work focuses on the prevention of microbial, chemical, and foreign body contamination during food processing. He has written over 100 publications and given over 200 external presentations and is highly respected as a teacher.

Dr. Edyta Margas, food safety and hygienic design expert at Bühler AG, performs research, consultancy, and training in areas related to emerging processing methods and factory hygiene issues.

Deb Smith, Vikan’s global hygiene specialist, has over 30 years of food safety/research training and experience and has written and co-authored numerous food safety and hygiene publications.

Other speakers include:

  • Duane Grassman (market hygienist at Nestlé), who has over 40 years of sanitation, hygiene, and food safety experience.
  • Bill Bremer (principal, food safety compliance at Kestrel Management), who heads the food safety consulting group.
  • Dr. Stine Lønnerup Bislev (hygiene and compliance manager at Vikan), who holds a PhD in protein science and an MSc in biotechnology.
  • Amit Kheradia (education & technical support manager at Remco Products), who has over 12 years of food safety/quality and process technology training and experience.
  • Tom Kirby (director of national accounts at Accuform), who has over 27 years of experience with lean manufacturing techniques and 5S.

To see the schedule of presentations and learn more about the speakers or Remco Products and Vikan, please visit remcoproducts.com/IAFP2017.

How is HARPC Different From HACCP?

HACCP and HARPC share more than just four letters. They’re both food safety standards based on prevention, but they do differ on execution. Their differences and their similarities aren’t as important as the way they fit together for most food processors, though. A HARPC plan shouldn’t be considered as a replacement, but as a necessary upgrade to the conventional HACCP plan. Understanding how the systems fit together is the first step toward implementing both.

HACCP

HARPC

(1) Is the preventative approach based on a standard, guideline or a set of laws?
Based on a guideline recommended by CODEX and NACMCF Based on FSMA act and principally, the Final Rule for Preventive Controls for Human Food
(2) What food safety risks are considered using the preventative approach?
Conventional – Biological, Chemical, and Physical Beyond the conventional risks for actual and potential food safety hazards
(3) What is the goal of the preventative approach?
To prevent, eliminate (or) reduce hazards to a safe level (in that priority) Preventive controls that prevent or significantly minimize “known or reasonably foreseeable” risks
(4) Who is primarily responsible for the development and maintenance of the preventive plan?
Primarily, a competent HACCP coordinator with assistance from multidisciplinary team Trained Preventive Controls Qualified Individual (PCQI) as described in the FSMA Act
(5) At what frequency is the preventive plan being reviewed by the facility?
At least once a year, or when required At least once in 3 years, or when required
(6) The plan is mandatory for what type of establishments?
For FDA and USDA mandated establishments, or when required for certification purposes For all establishments along the food supply chain that serve U.S. consumers, unless exempted
(7) The plan is excluded or exempted for what type of establishments?
Unless mandated or required for certification, HACCP is voluntary, and GMPs are mandatory Exemption list is provided by FDA, but this does not exempt facilities from following at least CGMPs
(8) Who is the interested party here? For whom is the plan for?
Stakeholders: auditors, inspectors, and customers The FDA
(9) What is the documented approach for making the preventive plan?
12 Steps of HACCP (includes 7 Principles) 7 Steps of Developing a HARPC Plan

HARPC as an Upgrade to HACCP

HACCP, or Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points, is already widely used due to requirements from retailers, auditing standards, and inspectors, though the USDA and the FDA only mandate it for meat, seafood, and juice products. As a global standard conceptualized the 1960s, HACCP has been continually developed and updated. HACCP requires a multi-disciplinary team for implementation and follows prescriptive steps.

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FDA Final Rule on the Sanitary Transportation of Food Compliance Gains Momentum

 

The FDA’s final rule on the sanitary transportation of food went into effect June 6, 2016. Though larger carriers, shippers, and receivers should have their compliance plans in place, smaller companies (fewer than 500 employees and less than $27.5 million in annual receipts) still have two years from the rule publication date to comply with the requirements.

This final rule—the sixth of seven rulemakings for FSMA—was based on a combination of the Sanitary Transportation of Food Act of 2005 and about 240 submissions from transportation companies, food safety organizations, consumer advocacy groups, and more.

The rulemaking has been proposed to ensure:

  1. Proper refrigeration during transportation of foods that require it;
  2. That vehicles and food storage are adequately cleaned and sanitized; and
  3. That there is adequate protection for food during transport.

Waivers have been proposed to exempt carriers, shippers, and receivers who hold valid permits and are inspected under National Conference on Interstate Milk Shipments (NCIMS) Grade ‘‘A’’ Milk Safety Program only when they’re shipping Grade A milk and milk products. The exemption should also apply to retail and food service operations that hold valid permits only when they are engaged in transportation operations as receivers, or as shippers and carriers in operations in which food is relinquished to consumers after transportation from the establishment.

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