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Being a Food Safety-Minded Consumer

As a consumer with a passion for food and cooking, I know a thing or two about food safety in the kitchen. In my time at Remco, I’ve learned a lot more and have become acutely aware of all the considerations for the safety of our food as it moves from farm to fork. I am amazed at how much food safety professionals need to know in order to perform their daunting jobs.

Lettuce greens and food safetyI try to be aware of basic food safety guidelines in my kitchen. I use a meat thermometer to be sure the food is within the safe range, but also because I prefer not to overcook it. I avoid the cans with dents at the grocery, because the good ones stack better in the pantry—but also because some dents may compromise the integrity of the product. I clean my grill tools before flipping food if they’ve come into contact with raw meat, and I always use a fresh plate to bring food back inside.

Now that I’ve worked closely within the food industry for over three years, I’m starting to think a little differently about my own food safety. My new awareness goes beyond my own kitchen. Lately I’ve started to wonder about the food safety efforts at the facilities that produce the food I buy. And I’ll tell you, when I hear about a producer going above and beyond for food safety, it sticks with me.

A great example is Earthbound Farms—a California salad greens grower and packager. I read recently that they are BRC validated, which requires very rigorous third-party audits. As a consumer, the fact that they have pursued food safety validations above and beyond requirements tells me that they really care about the safety of their consumers. And they are very transparent about their food safety program. They’ve gained a loyal consumer in me.

With that being said, food safety in my kitchen now starts with getting to know a little bit more about where my food comes from—not just the temperature it arrives at when I’m done cooking it. I now seek information about the food safety programs of producers I purchase from, and I’m willing to spend a bit more if I know that they are diligent in their efforts.

Remco at Process EXPO 2013

At Remco, we’re gearing up to exhibit at Process EXPO 2013 on November 3-6 at McCormick Place in Chicago. We’ve been through this drill a few times in the past 28 years, but this time is going to be a little different. That’s because Remco has evolved—drastically—in the last year. And we’re ready to show off the results of that evolution in a couple short weeks at Process EXPO. You’ll find us in a shiny, new, redesigned and interactive display at booth #5245.

Remco booth sneak peekProcess EXPO aims to bring you the latest innovations and solutions to critical issues. Remco and Vikan have planned a show strategy that highlights the innovations and solutions we offer. We’ll also be celebrating the 25th anniversary of our partnership. Possibly the biggest innovation we have to offer is our mutually realigned focus on adding value to the food safety efforts of food processors. As complex as food safety is, Remco and Vikan can provide plenty of support above and beyond offering high-quality cleaning and material handling tools. 

As far as innovations you’ll see at Process EXPO, we can name a few. Not only will Remco unveil an interactive new display that will allow you to test out products from Remco and Vikan, but we’ll also offer live demonstrations of Vikan’s new Hygienic Zone Planner Application for the iPad. This innovative app makes quick work of building custom color-coding programs. You’ll definitely want to see the new app in action—there’s nothing else out there like it. 

Vikan also unveiled a redesigned line of products called the EDGE Range earlier in 2013. The first products offered were four styles of hand brushes, and the new style dustpans are now trickling into the market. These products not only feature a sleek new style, but the design actually makes the products more hygienic as explained in our April 5 blog article. We’ll have plenty of the EDGE Range products on hand to see, feel, and use.

Process EXPOCritical issues in food processing environments are about a dime a dozen, and we’ve got solutions to offer. If cross-contamination is a concern, you’ll find that color-coding may be a helpful solution in controlling it. When you need support and guidance for building your own program, we can help. We’re looking forward to starting a dialogue with you at Process EXPO regarding your color-coding needs and how we can support you. In the meantime, you’ll find a host of resources in the Remco Knowledge Center

If regulatory compliance is on your mind, we have some insights to share. We’ve recently released white papers on HACCP and Current food Good Manufacturing Practices (CGMPs). Remco’s own Cristal Garrison has also attained certifications from the International HACCP Alliance and AIB. If you’d like to schedule a time during Process EXPO to speak in person with Cristal about your compliance efforts, submit your information on her contact page.

We’re looking forward to seeing you at Process EXPO. We’re interested in finding out what innovations and solutions you’re seeking. What seminars are you planning to participate in? Also, if you need a pass to the exhibit hall, click on the button below to submit your information. Remco can set you up with a complimentary exhibit registration.

The Birth of Food Safety, the FDA and CGMPs

Lately, we’ve been talking about Current food Good Manufacturing Practices—CGMPs for short—because they are the set of regulations that apply to just about every food processor not regulated by the USDA. CGMPs have also been getting quite a bit of press lately since we may see an update as a result of FSMA. We released an earlier blog article and a white paper on the topic for those who want to learn more.

But did you know that many of the regulations that guide the production of today’s food were largely spawned by the works of investigative journalists? These journalists were referred to as “muckrakers,” and they exposed government and business corruption.

food safety and 1900s meatpackingOne of the most well-known of these journalists was Upton Sinclair, who spent seven weeks working undercover in the Chicago meatpacking district on a research mission to expose the injustices and hazardous working conditions faced by meat industry workers. In Sinclair’s novel, The Jungle, his vivid descriptions of the unsanitary practices of the meatpacking industry captured the attention of the American public and President Theodore Roosevelt.

After reading The Jungle, Roosevelt sent a pair of advisors to assess the truthfulness of the novel’s depictions—and their report swayed the President to believe that Sinclair had provided an accurate representation. Shortly after Sinclair’s works became widespread, the Pure Food and Drugs Act and the Meat Inspection Act were passed in 1906. The passage of these regulations marked a turning point in federal food safety and was the beginning of what we know today as the FDA.

Although Sinclair had hoped that his accounts would improve working conditions for America’s poor laborers, he ended up making a huge and lasting impact on food safety. He was later quoted as saying, “I aimed for the public’s heart, and by accident hit it in the stomach.”

The early regulations were more specific about the standards for pharmaceuticals and accurate product labeling, and policies regarding food were much more ambiguous. Over the next 30 years, gaps in the protections provided to consumers by these regulations were exposed by a new generation of investigative journalists. In 1938, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, received enthusiastically by an American public that had witnessed one too many food and drug safety disasters. This was the first law that mandated legally enforceable food standards, and CGMPs for food were officially established later on in 1969.

No one can deny that we have come a long, long way for food safety since the days written about by Upton Sinclair. But we may soon see another era of modernization of our food safety regulations. Do you think that the updates proposed by FSMA go far enough in preventing the production of unsafe foods? Are there holes in today’s laws you think should be considered? Tell us your thoughts.

Five Types of GMPs for Food Processing

Assuring quality of a manufactured product requires certain procedures and standards. In many industries, these procedures and standards are often referred to as Good Manufacturing Practices, or GMPs. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) outlines Current food Good Manufacturing Practices, or CGMPs, in Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 110 (21 CFR 110).

The FDA provides CGMPs to assure that food processors maintain sanitary conditions that minimize the risk of contamination by “hazardous” materials. We’ll cover what the FDA considers hazards in a future blog entry. But for now, we’ll focus on CGMPs.

So what aspects of a food processing operation should be controlled and monitored to assure they conform to CGMPs? Through working with food processors, we’ve found that just about every aspect of a food processing operation might come under scrutiny during an inspection — from the personal hygiene of the workers in the plant, to the equipment used to make the food products, to the processing facility itself.

The FDA outlines CGMPs in five subparts:

1. General Provisions — Do you know the terminology that should be used in describing CGMPs? This first section provides guidelines. It also explains when to use “shall” versus “should” in differentiating between when compliance is necessary (“shall”) and when procedures and practices are directly related to insanitary conditions as specified in Section 402(4)(a) (“should”). It also delineates plant and employee responsibilities with regard to personal hygiene. Food safety education is addressed as well as the need for supervisory personnel to ensure compliance.

2. Building and Facilities — How should a facility be designed and maintained to help assure food safety? In this section, CGMPs are outlined for the maintenance of the grounds, including litter control, waste removal and treatment, and grounds maintenance and drainage. Plants should be designed and built to reduce the potential for contamination. Sanitary operations, facilities and controls are also outlined.

3. Equipment — This section provides requirements and expectations for the design, construction and maintenance of equipment and utensils to ensure sanitary conditions. But did you know it also includes an automatic control for regulating temperature or an alarm system to alert employees to significant change in temperature? Other requirements are general and intended to prevent contamination from any source.

4. Process and Controls — How should a food processing facility keep sanitary conditions in check? This section of CGMPs addresses general sanitation and controls necessary to ensure that food is suitable for human consumption. It addresses the monitoring of physical factors (critical control points or CCPs), such as time, temperature, humidity, pH, flow rate, and acidification. Warehouse and distribution requirements are also included, requiring finished foods to be stored and distributed under conditions that protect against physical, chemical and microbial contamination. The container must also be protected from deterioration. This section also outlines very general requirements for warehousing and distribution.

5. Defect Action Levels — There may be unsanitary circumstances that are simply inescapable. So how does the FDA address this? This last part allows the FDA to define maximum defect action levels (DALs) for a defect that is natural or unavoidable even when foods are produced under CGMPs (as covered in the sections above). These defects are not hazardous to health at low levels and include rodent filth, insects or mold. Those exceeding maximum DALs will be considered in violation.

We continue to appreciate the diligence our food processing customers demonstrate in following CGMPs to assure high-quality food products. What are your facility’s CGMPs, and how do you verify that your operation is in compliance? As you have gained experience in the industry, are there any types of required controls that surprised you? What other aspects of food processing do you think should be controlled that aren’t currently covered in regulations? We’d love to hear more about the policies and procedures that have been successful for you. And to learn more about food safety practices and CGMPs for food processing, check out our white paper, Understanding GMPs in Food Processing.

Building your HACCP Plan—Part 2

In our last blog entry, we covered tips for completing the first steps of a HACCP Plan. We asked the question, “How do we develop a HACCP plan? Here’s a quick recap of Part 1. First, we suggested gaining an understanding of the seven HACCP principles. Second, from our experience working with various food processors, we’ve seen it’s important to involve your key department managers from quality control, engineering, maintenance and operations in developing the plan. Third, if your company produces multiple products, you may consider identifying and including all products that will be part of your HACCP Plan. We even heard from one reader that he found it helpful to complete a HACCP review on each ingredient for better control.

HACCP compliance verification produce processingWhere should your HACCP planning go from here? The next key steps in developing an effective HACCP Plan involve honest, disciplined and critical thinking about your entire production process —from the time ingredients enter your facility, to when your finished products are shipped. In thinking through your production process, ask the following questions with your team:

  • Do we have thorough documentation of our processes?
  • Where might potential hazards exist in our processes?
  • Do Critical Control Points (CCPs) exist, and if so, what control measures should we establish to minimize those hazards?
  • Do we have sufficient documentation to communicate our processes and food safety initiatives to new employees and visiting inspectors?

Asking these questions and discussing them with your team should lead you in the right direction for developing a HACCP plan to fit your business. You may also find the next suggested steps to be helpful in providing some direction based on the experiences of other food production companies.

1. Visualize every step of your process.

Many businesses that have been producing food for decades have found it helpful to do a thorough, objective review of processes even if they understand those processes inside and out. By sitting down and literally mapping out every step, potential food safety issues that went previously unnoticed are able to be identified. It’s been our observation that successful food processors find it helpful to use a Process Workflow Chart to illustrate each step of their processes. From the time ingredients, packaging and other raw materials enter your facility to the final stages when your products are packaged, labeled and shipped, you can strengthen your food safety by accounting for every step in your food process. What does one of these Process Workflow Charts look like? Below is a simplified version as an example.

Process workflow chart example

2. Evaluate potential hazards and identify CCPs.

At a minimum, it’s suggested by the International HACCP Alliance that your HACCP Plan identify and prioritize hazards and their critical limits, as well as establish actions to eliminate, prevent or reduce the hazards. How does one do this? Many food processors use what is called a Decision Matrix, as suggested by the FDA. A Decision Matrix (see example below) begins by reviewing each step in the workflow process, then it assists you in evaluating the likelihood of hazards that could occur. Once a hazard is identified, then it is evaluated whether or not it is a CCP.

FDA Example of Decision Tree

3. Create a Hazard Analysis Worksheet.

At this point you may be thinking, “Isn’t every hazard also a CCP?” Not necessarily. If a control measure is already in place to address the hazard, then the hazard is not a CCP. If a control is NOT in place to secure food safety, then it is a CCP and a control measure should be considered to reduce the hazard. CGMP’s (Current Good Manufacturing Practices) are one of the many control measures that can often address hazards and eliminate the need to identify hazards as a CCP. We’ll cover CGMP’s in more depth in future blog articles.

To help evaluate the severity of each hazard, many food processors use a Hazard Analysis Worksheet. Below is an example. You’ll see that along the top of the worksheet are the key areas of analysis, starting with the ingredient/step in the process being evaluated through to the final determination of whether or not it is a CCP and its risk rating (1 through 5). Look through each line of the worksheet and you’ll discover why not all hazards are CCPs.

Hazard analysis worksheet example

4. Keep up your HACCP Plan.

Putting together your HACCP Plan is one thing. Monitoring it regularly is a good way to reinforce food safety efforts in your organization. We have found that ongoing maintenance by a dedicated HACCP Coordinator within your organization can help you stay one step ahead of new potential risks that may quietly enter into your processes. Anytime anything changes within your process (i.e., you add new employees, change vendors, update packaging, etc.), it’s suggested to re-evaluate your HACCP Plan.

For a more thorough review of the HACCP planning process, be sure to check out our HACCP Planning white paper.

Building your HACCP Plan—Part 1

With the advent of the Food Safety and Modernization Act of 2011, many food processors are taking proactive steps to develop a HACCP Plan. As new rules related to FSMA are proposed, many processors are asking the question, “How do we develop a HACCP Plan?”

HACCP quality check in food processing facilityLet’s start with a brief review. HACCP stands for “Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point.” A HACCP Plan includes a series of procedures to control the process and sensitive points in the food chain, with the ultimate goal of producing consumer foods that are safe for consumers’ health.

Through our research on the subject and working with food processors, we’ve observed several suggested steps in developing an effective HACCP Plan. In this blog entry, we’ll cover three tips for developing a successful HACCP Plan. We’ll follow up with another blog to cover a few more helpful suggestions.

1. Understand the seven HACCP principles.

The United States Department of Agriculture provides seven principles for developing a HACCP Plan: 1) Conduct a Hazard Analysis, 2) Identify Critical Control Points (CCPs), 3) Establish Critical Limits for each Critical Control Point, 4) Establish Critical Control Point Monitoring Requirements, 5) Establish Corrective Actions, 6) Establish Record Keeping Procedures, and 7) Establish Procedures for Verifying the HACCP System is Working as Intended.

Realizing that’s a lot to digest right there, we suggest you visit the FSIS website to read in more detail about the seven principles and what’s involved with each one. Basically, your HACCP Plan will start with a Hazard Analysis of each product, then you’ll need to work through each point in the process to determine CCPs, then establish and monitor corrective actions for those CCPs. (See our previous blog article that covers more about CCPs.)

2. Use the power of the team.

In our observations, some of the best HACCP Plans are those developed by a team within a food processing organization. Who should be on your team depends on the structure of your organization, but typical titles included are:

  • HACCP Coordinator
  • Quality Assurance Manager
  • Plant Operations Manager
  • Engineering Manager
  • Maintenance Manager
  • Sanitation Manager and/or Supervisor
  • Shipping & Receiving (Warehouse) Manager and/or Supervisor
  • Line Supervisor and/or Machine Operator

In our experience, the HACCP Coordinator is usually the point person for the HACCP Plan. This person is ultimately responsible for coordinating and maintaining the HACCP Plan. If you don’t have a HACCP Coordinator within your organization, then your Quality Assurance Manager or even CEO may be the appropriate person to have that responsibility.

We appreciate learning more about how companies assign  HACCP responsibilities — what works and what doesn’t. Email us your thoughts on this issue at Sales@remcoproducts.com.

3. Identify the products that will be covered by the HACCP Plan.

Unless you’re a very small food processor, chances are your company produces more than one product. Thus, it’s important to identify every product that will be covered by your HACCP Plan. For each product, your Hazard Analysis should include the product name and description, its ingredients and processing methods, food safety factors involved with processing the product, how it is distributed, the product’s intended use and target consumer.

With these three steps covered, next you’ll get into the heart and soul of your HACCP Plan. For your convenience, we’ll cover more steps in our next blog entry. In the meantime, you may enjoy reading an overview of HACCP planning from the University of Florida IFAS Extension, or our white paper, “HACCP Planning for Food Safety.”

Five Things You Maybe Didn’t Know About HACCP

If you work in food processing, chances are you’re probably familiar with the concept of a Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point or HACCP. Here’s a little about what we’ve learned about HACCP.

HACCP food safety sample verificationAs part of a HACCP Plan, a Hazard Analysis identifies “Critical Control Points” or CCPs — those points, steps or procedures in food manufacturing process at which control can be applied and as a result, a food safety hazard can be prevented, eliminated or reduced to an acceptable level. With CCPs identified, a HACCP Plan provides a series of procedures to control the process and sensitive points in the food chain, with the ultimate goal of producing foods that are safe for consumers’ health.

HACCP is a part of the Food Safety and Modernization Act (FSMA) proposed by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) in 2011. While FSMA is fairly new, did you know the concept of HACCP has actually been around for some time? Here is the answer to that question along with some other interesting things about HACCP that many people may not be aware of.

1. HACCP is not a new system.

HACCP is a concept that’s been around since the 1960s. It was developed by the Pillsbury Company, the US Army Laboratories and NASA to help produce safe food for space missions. Today, HACCP is a recognized international standard for safe food production. It is endorsed by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), the World Health Organization (WHO), and in the United States by the National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods (NACMCF).

2. Not every hazard is a CCP.

As part of putting together a HACCP Plan, there’s a thought-process or Decision Matrix one can use to review each step in a food workflow process and determine the likelihood of hazards that could occur. Once a hazard is identified, then it is evaluated whether or not it is a CCP. Going through this evaluation, one will soon discover that not every hazard is a CCP. If a control measure is already in place to address the hazard, then chances are the hazard is not a CCP.

3. It takes a team to put together a HACCP Plan.

Through our experiences working with food processors, we’ve seen that some of the best HACCP Plans are the result of a team effort by the key individuals responsible for food safety within a food processing operation. The team may include managers from quality assurance, plant operations, engineering, maintenance, sanitation, and shipping & receiving. In addition, it’s often advised that someone who works on the line, such as a Line Supervisor and/or Machine Operator, provide input to the HACCP Plan to help assure alignment with day-to-day operations.

4. One person should be responsible for the HACCP Plan.

While it often takes a team to put together a well-structured HACCP Plan, we’ve also observed that maintaining the plan should ideally be the responsibility of just one person within a food processing organization. That person is usually the HACCP Coordinator. However, if there is no HACCP Coordinator, then the responsibility often falls to the Quality Manager, or even the company’s CEO.

5. Review the HACCP Plan regularly.

In a perfect world, anytime something changes within a food process, then the HACCP Coordinator should review the HACCP Plan and update it accordingly. At the very least, it’s suggested that a HACCP Plan be reviewed every 3 to 6 months.

How does your food processing facility deal with HACCP? If you have any additional tips or observations about putting together and maintaining a successful HACCP Plan, we’d love to hear them.

Cleaning and Sanitizing Basics for Food Plants

Food processing facilities turn out many products that nourish and feed our human communities; however, they also provide an attractive environment to encourage the growth of potentially harmful microbiological communities. How does your operation address these risks? Blue broom sweeping oats food processing food safetyThrough recent visits to production environments, we know how much effort goes into building sanitation programs that maintain hygienic conditions to protect the health of the intended human consumers. We’re also familiar with the complex codes and regulations, such as FSMA (Food Safety Modernization Act) and CFR Title 21: Food and Drugs, that exist to address the importance of proper food safety standards in food plants. Now more than ever, it’s important to know where to start when it comes to food safety.

Cleaning and sanitizing certainly go together, but are separate processes that achieve different outcomes. A GMP Training Module from the Cornell Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management offers great definitions of cleaning and sanitizing. Basically, cleaning involves the removal of dirt, residue and debris from the surface of bench tops, equipment, floors, and other surfaces in a food plant, and is performed prior to a sanitizing process. An effective sanitizing program is designed to reduce the number of pathogenic microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, yeasts and molds on a cleaned surface to acceptable levels through thermal or chemical means.

Cleaning and sanitizing procedures are unique to each food processing facility, and there’s no template. We have come to learn that building design, temperature, humidity, and oxygen content all factor in when considering a sanitation program. Also, the type of equipment present and the type of debris and microbiological risks involved will influence the program and affect the frequency and the type of cleaning and sanitizing procedures necessary. We’ve observed that many successful food processors designate a food safety team to determine the appropriate methods to maintain a hygienic environment for production. We’d like to hear about your sanitation program and experiences you’ve had at your facility.

The object of a cleaning process is to capture and remove food soils, and then wash them away. Thorough cleaning of an area supports the integrity of an effective sanitizing process, and cleaning comes before sanitizing in every program. A soap- or detergent-based cleaning compound helps to emulsify fats and suspend undesired particulates in order to properly remove them from the area being cleaned. Cleaning compounds can neutralize many sanitizing agents, so they also must be completely rinsed before proceeding. This kind of information is typically readily available from your chemical supplier, so it’s a good idea to work with one who can provide you the knowledge and documentation you need relative to chemicals used in your program.

An effective sanitizing procedure is another piece of the puzzle in maintaining a hygienic environment for food processing. Microbiological risks are not controlled through good cleaning procedures alone. Your facility’s food safety team may rely on a variety of methods to ensure that the overall sanitation program achieves the desired reduction of microbial populations.

Cleaning and sanitizing programs are a critical part of every food processing operation. Our experience has taught us that designating one employee to be responsible for the oversight of food safety efforts is a good approach, and supporting that person with a team is even better. We’d like to hear about your sanitation program and the ways your food operation is going above and beyond for food safety. If you’re a new employee at your plant, or you’re just starting to learn about cleaning and sanitizing, download our basic checklist of factors to consider for cleaning and sanitizing. And tell us about your experience with sanitation: what does the process look like at your facility? What methods have you found useful?

Clean more efficiently with new tools in Vikan’s® EDGE Brush Range

Vikan’s New EDGE Brush Range features improved ergonomics and functionality

In a food processing environment where hygiene is critical, dependable cleaning tools are a must. For over 115 years, Vikan® has focused on developing the most hygienic and efficient cleaning tools in the world. This year, Vikan unveiled the new EDGE Brush Range that is designed for superior efficiency, functionality and ergonomics. This is great news for the people responsible for cleaning and sanitizing food processing facilities. Why? Because those folks are going to get their jobs done more quickly and easily with better tools.

In addition to efficiency and ergonomics, the other great feature about these brushes is that they look really slick. Who wouldn’t like to work with a cleaning tool that looks good and does a great job? Not that aesthetics make or break the deal, but it just naturally feels a little better when your tools are attractive, right?

At the beginning of the year, Vikan introduced the first three brush styles in the EDGE Brush Range: a long-handled, a short-handled, and a scrubbing hand brush. These three new styles replaced six total part numbers since each style is typically offered in two or more bristle strengths.

The most recent addition to the EDGE Brush Range is the new bench brush style, part numbers 4587 with soft bristles and 4589 with medium bristles. The block on these brushes has been redesigned with a more ergonomic handle, and the bristles are positioned to be more effective at cleaning the tough stuff. We’ve got all the nitty-gritty details posted in the online catalog for both part numbers. Below is a synopsis of the redesigned benefits:

Selling points of Vikan's new EDGE range

If you’re interested to know how the bristle strengths differ, here is a quick description.  The 4587 bench brush with soft bristles will be really effective on fine particles that are dry. Think flour and powdered sugar. The medium bristles on the 4589 make it perfect for sweeping up moist materials, or medium-sized particles like sugar, chocolate, pastry or vegetable peelings.

In the redesign, Vikan did us another favor and offered the 4589 in all 8 colors: green, blue, red, white, yellow, orange, purple, and black. Black was previously unavailable in the 4588, which is the part number that the 4589 is replacing. At Remco Products, we like offering tools in all 8 colors, because color-coding is gaining recognition as an important element in HACCP and food safety initiatives. Offering more colors provides a high degree of flexibility for the people who are designing new color-coding systems or improving upon existing programs. Having a well-designed color-coding program can go a long way for facilities applying for various food safety certifications or that have an FDA audit approaching.

If you’re intrigued and want to learn more about color-coding, we’ve recently released a white paper all about the reasons why color-coding is becoming a no-brainer in all types of food processing facilities. Even though color-coding is not required by law, it shows that the people in charge of quality assurance and food safety are putting in their due diligence to keep the food products that they manufacture safe. If this sounds like something you need to know more about, feel free to download a copy of the white paper to keep or share with colleagues.